My blog turned 2 today (: 9 notes
gravitationalbeauty:

Inside the Flame Nebula
randomghost:

Green City by Florent Llamas
distant-traveller:

SN 1006 supernova remnant

A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth’s sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000 light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)
gameraboy:

tim white - a jungle of stars by Myriac Acia on Flickr.
Anonymous: hey you're really pretty

hey you’rE REALLY NICE THANK YOU

sinkingshits: would you ever go in the streets with a "free hugs" sign?

Probably, not on my own though I’d take some friends xd

treescommunicate:

i’d like to walk again,
skip sleep to breathe the nightly air.

i’d like to yawn again,
as the first beams of sunlight,
softly glisten in her hair.

i’d like to cry again,
because the flowers always die,
and that just seemed so unfair.

i’d give anything,
to be back there.

6 notes
distant-traveller:

Merging galaxies and droplets of starbirth



The Universe is filled with objects springing to life, evolving and dying explosive deaths. This new image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures a snapshot of some of this cosmic movement. Embedded within the egg-shaped blue ring at the centre of the frame are two galaxies. These galaxies have been found to be merging into one and a “chain” of young stellar superclusters are seen winding around the galaxies’ nuclei.
At the centre of this image lie two elliptical galaxies, part of a galaxy cluster known as [HGO2008]SDSS J1531+3414, which have strayed into each other’s paths. While this region has been observed before, this new Hubble picture shows clearly for the first time that the pair are two separate objects. However, they will not be able to hold on to their separate identities much longer, as they are in the process of merging into one.
Finding two elliptical galaxies merging is rare, but it is even rarer to find a merger between ellipticals rich enough in gas to induce star formation. Galaxies in clusters are generally thought to have been deprived of their gaseous contents; a process that Hubble has recently seen in action. Yet, in this image, not only have two elliptical galaxies been caught merging but their newborn stellar population is also a rare breed.
The stellar infants — thought to be a result of the merger — are part of what is known as “beads on a string” star formation. This type of formation appears as a knotted rope of gaseous filaments with bright patches of new stars and the process stems from the same fundamental physics which causes rain to fall in droplets, rather than as a continuous column.
Nineteen compact clumps of young stars make up the length of this “string”, woven together with narrow filaments of hydrogen gas. The star formation spans 100,000 light years, which is about the size of our galaxy, the Milky Way. The strand is dwarfed, however, by the ancient, giant merging galaxies that it inhabits. They are about 330,000 light years across, nearly three times larger than our own galaxy. This is typical for galaxies at the centre of massive clusters, as they tend to be the largest galaxies in the Universe.
The electric blue arcs making up the spectacular egg-like shape framing these objects are a result of the galaxy cluster’s immense gravity. The gravity warps the space around it and creates bizarre patterns using light from more distant galaxies.


Image credit: NASA, ESA/Hubble and Grant Tremblay (European Southern Observatory)
acidicfizz:

Commission: Earthview by KM33